Katsugen Undo

Adapted from: http://www.hara-awareness.eu/Katsugen_Undo_e.html

Katsugen Undo regenerative movements are an effective body and energy work technique to support deep let go and restore vitality and health in the body, mind and soul.

Katsugen Undo is Japanese and means “movement from within” or “life renewing itself from the source”.

Based on the fact that each body has a natural and individual sense of order which lies in deep connection with its own life energy, there are guidelines and precise techniques to stimulate this inherent life energy within. Through these techniques, the body is brought to a space where it can self-regulate itself, mind and soul to a state of health and balance without the use of any outside agents.

The spontaneous movements release energy blocks in the spine and nervous system. The body has the chance to find, in a completely natural way and without any overexertion, its very own rhythm.

With the help of the guided exercises and hands on energy work, the body’s spontaneous movements can be awakened. The function of the brain and the hara – the center in the belly – can come into a state of balance. Alone, with a partner, or also in groups, by supporting each others flow of Qi, life energy in the body is given space to find its very own natural movements.

These movements can be subtle and soft, or also dynamic and powerful. The impulse of each movement comes from the self regulative healing force of the body and is thus spontaneous. In addition, repressed feelings from the past, which are stored as tensions in the body and nervous system get released without having to reenter the emotional memory. Energy is freed and transformed.

Katsugen Undo is a direct way to experience freedom and space in the here and now; without any preset ideas, one can let go to the wisdom of the body, trust and thus follow the impulses that then arise.

6 thoughts on “Katsugen Undo

  1. Bel

    Your article is very interesting for me, a seitai researcher. Would it be possible to know the author’s name? The katsugen undo described here is word by word Noguchi seitai. I would like to know about the link and transmission of katsugen undo. When does this word appears first in Japan ? Did it started with Keizo Hashimoto, continued with Michio Takahashi and then was grasped by Haruchika Noguchi ? Thanks in advance for your answer.
    Andréine Bel

    1. heiko Post author

      As indicated in the articles header this article is a sort of an accumulation. Its source is http://www.hara-awareness.de/Katsugen_Undo.html
      It was (re)written by me. I’m not a Seitai practiotioner although Seitai seems to be one root of Sotai ho. According to Hashimoto it started in the 1920s with Takahashi applying unfocused pleasant movements. And he successfully relieved illnesses.
      I think Takahashi was an artist while Hashimoto was a scientist. That’s why Sotai is more focused on body patterns.

  2. Bel

    I continue my message posted half an our ago. The second question would be : could it be Noguchi’s seitai that inspired the authot to write his article on katsugen undo and sotaiho ?
    Cordially,
    Andréine Bel

    1. heiko Post author

      The point is there is not much information about Takahashis’ Seitai around in the Web. Not even about Seitai. When I wrote this post I was happy to find that site in question. And as far as I remember its source seems to be Noguchi sensei.

  3. Andréine Bel

    Dear Heiko,

    Sorry for the delay in my reply: I found your answers only today. I shall be more careful in the future, or you can email me at . I would very much appreciate to exchange more with you and in private about possible links between sotai and seitai.

    Sotai is a very recent discovery to me, although I heard its name long time ago. I am under the impression that sotai preceded and influenced seitai, Hashimoto being much elder than Haruchika Noguchi who was born in 1911. Noguchi is considered, by some of his students, to have “refined” sotai by adding taiheki (postual tendencies) and katsugen undo.

    The site describes quite accurately katsugen undo, but it looks like a copy-paste from other sites, the photo has nothing to do with the practice, and the target of the whole site is “personal development”, which is quite far from Katsugen’s philosophy.

    I learnt katsugen undo with Itsuo Tsuda, from 1971 when he came to France to create groups of practice. I have been practicing it since then and developed katsugen soho as a tool for health and cure.

    From what I read in the book “Sotai, Natural exercices” and on your site/videos, sotai could be one of the main roots of seitai, extremely effective and well-thought. Figuring out that Noguchi did not “invent” seitai, as often claimed, but made it evolve, is rather a good sign for me…

    What influenced sotai interests me as well. I would like to further trace the different inputs and links to seitai. Could you develop what you say of “Takahashi applying unfocused pleasant movements”. I thought that seitaijutsu was on contrary focussed on how to go towards the side of the pain, maintain it and then release. I had understood that Hashimoto, though influenced by seitaijutsu, had developed sotai to mark his opposition to taiso, as a reverse view. I have difficulty to find any English writings on Takahashi, not to speak about his book. Any track to follow ?

    On seitai, the nine French books from Tsuda would require English translation. The first attempt was such a disaster that copies were removed from bookshops. It seems that a brand new translation is on the make, ready to be printed. If you are interested, please contact Manon Soavi on my part, at .

    I am preparing a book on my 30-year practice and research on seitai, particularly on katsugen soho. It will be published within a few months, but in French. Hopefully translated in a forthcoming version…

    In any case, thanking you for this exchange, au plaisir de vous lire,

    Andréine Bel

    1. heiko Post author

      Hello Andréine,

      thanks for your posting 😉

      What influenced sotai interests me as well. I would like to further trace the different inputs and links to seitai. Could you develop what you say of “Takahashi applying unfocused pleasant movements”. I thought that seitaijutsu was on contrary focussed on how to go towards the side of the pain, maintain it and then release. I had understood that Hashimoto, though influenced by seitaijutsu, had developed sotai to mark his opposition to taiso, as a reverse view. I have difficulty to find any English writings on Takahashi, not to speak about his book. Any track to follow?

      What I know about Takahashi is what I learned by Hayashi Kenji sensei who teaches a sort of a modern Aikido, Iai and Sotai.
      As far as I remember he told me that Hashimoto Keizo MD was rather a scientist who raffined some essential ideas of Seitai. That is mainly comfortable movement. And Hashimoto divided complex movements into well dosed therapeutic exercises. The 8 directions in space are an example for this approach. In fact you can explain every movement by these.
      That’s what I mean by saying ‘unfocused’ comfortable movements. I never heared about a positional release technique as you describe it – but I’m not a specialist (BTW do you have any sources because this fact makes a big difference!)

      Later Hashimoto developed his sudden relaxation technique which is due to his neurophysiological influence. This sudden relaxation reinforces muscle proteins paving anatomy trains (cq. tendon meridians – as far as I understand).
      I would appreciate to hear from you again.

      All the best, Heiko

Leave a Reply

Trackback URL für diesen Beitrag.